Microsoft was "going in the right direction" with its original vision for Xbox One, but it mismanaged its communication over the console's DRM and "economical model", Rayman creator Michel Ancel believes.

Michel ancel

Discussing the next-generation of consoles with last week, Ancel said that he believes "Microsoft maybe tried to move a bit too fast" with Xbox One, and failed to explain the possibilities offered by the console's original policies.

"They are going in the right direction but a bit too fast," said Ancel. "You need to bring people [in] with your ideas to make them understand. They can't understand everything if you don't let them experience things themselves."

Microsoft's major stumbling block was the way in which it communicated Xbox One's Kinect requirements and DRM policy, Ancel suggests.

"The good thing is to say, 'You want something and I allow you to have that thing'," he says. "Here it was more like, 'I know what you want and I'm going to force you to like that thing.' And people are not going to like that way, especially the gamers.

"It's very interesting. If you look at the smartphones, for example, it's really like, [they] don't force you to do this or that. It's very like, free games, games you go to buy, and in fact it's more about letting the people... making them want something.

"I'm not sure that Microsoft - with the Kinect and the economical model - I'm not sure they were making people want to see those things."

But despite the controversy Microsoft faced over its initial approach, Ancel says Xbox One's focus on digital may have been a "very good" direction for the console to take.

"Maybe they are right with the fact that this is the future and this is going to be very good," he continues, "but you can't force people to like something."

Microsoft reversed its decision on its original Xbox One DRM policies last month following mass criticism from fans, adopting a similar sharing system to the current Xbox 360.

The console is due to go on sale this November.