xbox one 11 -
xbox one 11 -

Microsoft has announced plans to drop Xbox One's controversial DRM policies "as a result of fan feedback", confirming that the console will no longer require online authentication every 24 hours, and that there will be "no limitations to using and sharing games".

"Last week at E3, the excitement, creativity and future of our industry was on display for a global audience," wrote IEB president Don Mattrick on Microsoft news site Xbox Wire.

"For us, the future comes in the form of Xbox One, a system designed to be the best place to play games this year and for many years to come. As is our heritage with Xbox, we designed a system that could take full advantage of advances in technology in order to deliver a breakthrough in game play and entertainment. We imagined a new set of benefits such as easier roaming, family sharing, and new ways to try and buy games. We believe in the benefits of a connected, digital future.

don mattrick111 -

"Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One.

"You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.

"So, today I am announcing the following changes to Xbox One and how you can play, share, lend, and resell your games exactly as you do today on Xbox 360."

An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games:
After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.

Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today:
There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.

The console will no longer be region-locked either, and due to the changes, all disc-based games require the disc to be present in the tray to be played. The option to share titles with up to 10 family members has been dropped, too.

Mattrick continues: "We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity. While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds.

"Thank you again for your candid feedback. Our team remains committed to listening, taking feedback and delivering a great product for you later this year."

Rumours of Microsoft's plans to alter its Xbox One policy first emerged earlier this evening, after separate reports claimed that Microsoft was to backtrack on previously announced DRM policies.

The news should go some way to revive confidence in fans put off by Microsoft's original policies. But is it enough? Let us know your thoughts on the platform holder's dramatic U-turn below.

Source: Xbox Wire

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Highest Rated Comment

ShadowmanX5's Avatar

ShadowmanX5

I think Microsoft simply tried pushing something that will eventually happen anyway, and forcing it upon people is never the way to do it. What they need to understand is that all you have to do, is make it more convenient for the consumer, treat them with real respect.

Netfix, iTunes and Steam are great examples of this, the reason they are so popular is because they are convenient for the customer, it gives them the option and flexibility to choose. If Microsoft simply make Digital download more appealing then more people will do it.
Posted 12:27 on 20 June 2013

User Comments

Antvomit's Avatar

Antvomit

I was actually looking forward to the Xbox1. To me it was going to be far different than the 360. Seems like the majority of people out there are just afraid of technological change. Pity we didn't give the Xbox1 a chance to show us what it could do before judging it. I hope not in the too long of the future m$ft will impliment the original ideas they had in mind.
Posted 20:57 on 20 June 2013
DancingRhino's Avatar

DancingRhino@ altaranga

Admitedly it does sound some places like they're damned if they do, damned if they don't. But I can't blame people. It's been a monumental ***** up in presentation, and just as people start to warm to some of the ideas, they through their toys out of the pram.
Posted 13:12 on 20 June 2013
FantasyMeister's Avatar

FantasyMeister

The way they should have sold the DRM was:

Want to share your physically bought games without needing the disc?
Want to share your entire digital library with your friends too?
Want to not have to be forced to have the disc in your tray when playing a game?

Because of the U-turn the XBox One can no longer offer any of this.

Instead of a U-turn, they should have offered an opt-in. Hell, they could probably have charged a one-off £4.99 to opt-in and gamers would stumped up for these features.

My personal feeling is that Microsoft are too focused on wanting to own the living room with an all singing all dancing box. I'm a gamer, I don't play games in my living room, I just want a machine that concentrates on video games. Microsoft will always meet resistance from me if they keep trying to force all these extras on me that I simply don't want.

The features listed above are something I'd love to have in a console; they're all, each and every one of them, game-centric. So in effect, backtracking on DRM has made the XBox One even less attractive to me.

Removing Kinect and all the other expensive and unnecessary-for-gaming components, however, might have swayed me.
Posted 13:09 on 20 June 2013
altaranga's Avatar

altaranga@ Karlius

"Before you spout nonsense think about what you are saying. "

For some reason that really made me chuckle.

One thing I have enjoyed since the u-turn is seeing all the people who said "I'M NOT BUYING AN XB1 COZ OF DRM" that are now saying "I HAVE NO RESPECT FOR MS COZ OF THE U-TURN ON DRM SO I'M NOT BUYING AN XB1!!"

Haters gonna hate I guess.

@ShadowmanX5: Well said, dude.
Posted 12:57 on 20 June 2013
ShadowmanX5's Avatar

ShadowmanX5

I think Microsoft simply tried pushing something that will eventually happen anyway, and forcing it upon people is never the way to do it. What they need to understand is that all you have to do, is make it more convenient for the consumer, treat them with real respect.

Netfix, iTunes and Steam are great examples of this, the reason they are so popular is because they are convenient for the customer, it gives them the option and flexibility to choose. If Microsoft simply make Digital download more appealing then more people will do it.
Posted 12:27 on 20 June 2013
Whitewolf's Avatar

Whitewolf@ Karlius

'The people who were complaining were simply scared of change'

Dont fix what isn't broken.
Posted 11:02 on 20 June 2013
rico_rico's Avatar

rico_rico

Great news they correct they're fault but its like ms do it on purpose why force drm and then remove it some thing odd is going on and why force kinect in every xbox just give us more freedom to buy what we like
Posted 10:54 on 20 June 2013
DancingRhino's Avatar

DancingRhino

Well, maybe I am talking nonsense. But technically it doesn't seem hard at all to me. We're talking about online checks taking up minimal space, and only checking on registered games?...

But their intentions were a total, fundamental change and they obviously thought it not worth while unless they could force it 100 percent straight away. They aren't known for subtlety mind.

Your statement about people only complaining out of fear is frankly just weird.
Posted 10:51 on 20 June 2013
Karlius's Avatar

Karlius@ DancingRhino

Of course it would. You just change the OS not to use DRM, the check in was used to refresh the DRM licensing hence that is not needed anymore.

Before you spout nonsense think about what you are saying.

To separate their market would be near impossible to comprehend for the average user so it's either or and they have gone with the wrong option in my opinion.
Posted 10:34 on 20 June 2013
DancingRhino's Avatar

DancingRhino@ Karlius

Well if you believed that stuff about infrastructure, this U-turn wouldn't have been possible. But, oh no, it just needs a day one online check to disable the drm. Technology is a wonderful thing - so it's impossible to make drm less discs but online bought games in line with their original intentions?

It's just microsoft pulling a pathetic hissy fit because they can't get everything they want.
Posted 10:24 on 20 June 2013
Karlius's Avatar

Karlius@ DancingRhino

Because it's about infrastructure it's either one or the other. You can't implement a DRM on half a service get a grip!

It was obviously about moving the market on instead we are staying stagnant and will take another 5 to 7 years of nothing to move on to the inevitable digital distribution.

The people who were complaining were simply scared of change I have seen nothing from any of them which suggest differently even those people I respect the views of came out with some crackers!
Posted 10:15 on 20 June 2013
DancingRhino's Avatar

DancingRhino

And why is it an all or nothing scenario? They're acting like arrogant pricks with this u-turn. The whole point of the mess was people didn't like the lack of choice. So if there are real advantages to these polices, why not give the choice to sign up to drm, family share etc, or buy drm-less with none of that?

On the podcast they were saying they suspected Microsoft wanted to say it would equal cheaper games eventually. Respectfully, I think that's bull. They have no concern for customers - they want all the profits, all the benefits and all the say. This U-turn illustrates this
Posted 10:08 on 20 June 2013
Karlius's Avatar

Karlius

Region free interests me.

Does it mean I can buy a console in USA and change the power brick? Does it mean that the BluRay drive will also be region free/0 meaning I can buy BluRays from around the world? If the latter is true expect this thing to sell like hot cakes!

The day after MS bin DRM and the ability to Share Games steam beta has been found to have the ability to do so. Hence they liked the MS model and followed suit:

http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/15...-from-xbox-one
Posted 10:00 on 20 June 2013
Syme's Avatar

Syme

Why does the DRM mean they can no longer move towards making cheaper downloads?
The problem now is they're still more expensive online than they are in the shops, not to mention download speeds at the moment mean I could still go to my local GAME and back before most games had finished downloading. There's also the relatively small hard drive space, which at the moment would mean I'd soon fill up the hard drive and would have to be uninstalling and re-downloading games.

By the end of the next generation, we may all be downloading everything anyway, but that'll happen when people are ready. I'm still on a limited monthly internet allowance. I can only download so much at the moment.
Posted 09:57 on 20 June 2013
Grammartron's Avatar

Grammartron

Bit at sea with all this flip-flopping. Listened to the podcast last night and the opinions voiced by Simon mirrored how I was beginning to feel about Xbone.

My biggest issues with the console were never around the DRM stuff, though I did feel that their stance on game ownership needed addressing. But now that they've U-turned completely (at least for now) I find myself simultaneously relieved, but also disappointed in some ways.

As someone who has never used Steam or gamed on PC, I was ready to embrace something new, and now I'm being sold something old - something that works pretty much identically to my 360 in most respects.

Think I'm going to try and avoid forming any concrete opinions for the next 12 months or so while launch and the messy initial scramble comes and goes. It'll be at least that long til I can afford a next-gen machine anyway, so going to reserve judgement for now.

Mind-blowing that MS have taken these steps though - must have been some serious swearing and brown-pants meetings behind the scenes for them to take these steps.
Posted 09:28 on 20 June 2013
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